Hertz Mobile App Redesign

Prompt

Design a better way for a mid-career professional who occasionally travels for work to find just the right vehicle when using the Hertz mobile app.

Target user group: mid-career professional

 

Solution

A mobile app that not only allows users to get their issues resolved in a timely manner but also helps them establish meaningful relationships with the invisible workforces in the community.

More specifically, my solution aims at achieving these 3 goals:

  1. Incentivize users in community issue reporting 

    • Provide them a stable point of contact that is always there

    • Direct & transparent communication

    • Reward them for their efforts 

  2. Improve the student-staff relationship in dorms

    • Custodians and technicians should be recognized for their work 

  3. Foster student's sense of ownership over their community, making them more responsible for the shared living space

Deliverable 

Prototype Walkthrough 

1/6

Process

Highlights

Scoping

Assumptions

Focus on the car browsing interaction.

What are the use cases that I want to design for:

first-time user/ non-frequent user 

or otherwise they can just go to my past reservation and 'do it again' 

 

1. User might not be familiar with the destination that they are traveling to 

2. User might have limited knowledge of cars 

3. User wants guidance in the selection process 

1. User values having lots of information and control over the kind of car they ultimately choose to reserve.

2. "I just want to browse and understand my options.”

Research Insights Given

Research

Phase 01:

Study the App 

Before anything, it is important to understand what you are designing and whom you are designing for. Thus, I spend some time to fully study the current version of the app, pretending I am a target user. Ideally, I would recruit a person or two from the target user group and have them do a think-aloud test to unveil the thinking process they go through in deicing on what to rent. 

Phase 02:

Comparative Analysis 

I also spend some time looking at other car rental apps that have received good ratings at the app store. By doing so, I'm trying to understand different flows and mental models that each app intends to carry out.

Phase 03:

Brainstorm 

Before diving into more secondary research, I first did a coup rounds of brainstorming by myself to come up with some questions and initial ideas that can later be addressed. Being self-referential is usually not a bad place to start especially when the problem is broad. 

Design Goals

Keeping all the research findings in mind, I identified 3 goals that I want to achieve with my design.

 

 

  1. Incentivize users in community issue reporting 

    • Provide them a stable point of contact that is always there

    • Direct & transparent communication

    • Reward them for their efforts 

  2. Improve the student-staff relationship in dorms

    • Custodians and technicians should be recognized for their work 

  3. Foster student's sense of ownership over their community, making them more responsible for the shared living space

 

 

Wireframes

With the feedback I got from speed-dating in mind, I started to map out screens.

I intended to use these frames as a way to quickly transfer scattered ideas from my mind onto paper. Thus it was meant to only map out the very high-level contents and how screens connect to each other. I also intend to use these to figure out the general layout of the app.

 

*Note that I took out the ranking/honor board feature as it was perceived very negatively in one of the speed dating session, and was perceived dispensable in the other.

Mid-fi

Prototypes  

I moved directly into Mid-fi screens because I personally work the best when I have real phrases, icons, buttons that I want to put into my design. Thus, for me low-fi is still a little too abstract for me especially given a very tight time frame for this specific design. 

 

I thought I was really clear about the goal that I want to achieve with this app, and that helped me a lot in making decisions on the fly as I was putting together the mid-fis.  I even made a few major changes to the app because the original design that I was going to implement was creaming to me that something is not right. So I just let myself fully immersed in the role of a  pick user and try to break the logic behind these design as I was creating the following screens..

 

As an example, I originally imaged to have one central place, similar to how Instagram handles feed, where all requests can be viewed by everyone that owns an account. That problem did not even jump out in dating, but when I started to put things together, I couldn't help asking myself: "But why would I need to know if someone's light bulb broke in the middle of the night?" Only after that, the idea of separating private space maintenance need and public maintenance jumps out at me.​

1/5

1. Users should have full control over whether or not to receive updates on any specific request. 

  • What if: One doesn't care about everything that is marked urgent but just one of them.

  • What if: One reported something just for the benefit of the community (ex. a broken printer that one does not need to use) and thus he does not necessarily care when the issue is solved. 
    • In this case, the user should be able to choose mute notification even on an incident that he reported himself.

 

2. Eliminate false positives (inaccurate report either intentional or unintentional).

  • Student ID integration

  • H  ave a real person approving each request (something the existing system already does)

  • (In the future, this can even be solved with good computer vision. This allows the system to automatically assess the situation by analyzing photo submissions from students.)

 

3. Provide more incentives to motivate students.

  • Although seeing other students engaged in helping the community can be perceived as an incentive itself, that effect is perceived rather passively.

  • Some kind of tangible reward might help students contextualize the fact that community issue reporting is mutually beneficial.

    • Reward should not have too much monetary value or otherwise might lead to increase false positives which work against point 2. 

    • A point system as an abstract representation of value (ex. x points = a free coffee).

    • Students should be able to reword both themselves or staffs who have helped the community.

 

Important Considerations

Takeaways

  • If I had more time, I would want to interview custodians and technicians instead of trying to figure out how they would react to the design by reading about them.  

  • I would also want to spend time implementing micro interactions in my prototypes to bring the experience to life. 

  • I realized that I spend too much time tweaking details in Figma, making everything pixel-perfect. I'm sure some of those were probably not necessary. 

 

Overall, I really enjoyed this challenge. Personally, I didn't really have a chance to complete a project from start to finish all just by myself. This experience definitely helped me gain a better sense of how I work best individually. I learned that I was even more open to making BIG changes to my designs I thought I was. In fact, when that happens, I was even very happy to move elements around and simplify my design. Discard everything that does not elevate the user experience and here we have something that will actually be able to solve a problem.

 

Yet as much as I enjoyed the challenge of working alone, this project also made me appreciate my team-project experience. I love getting feedbacks and,  though very cliche, learn from each other's strengths.